Author: Theresa

Bertrand relaxing in his hammock at Sipopo Beach, Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea 0

First Impressions of Malabo

We made it to Malabo. Finally. After leaving Jerusalem in February of 2017, it felt like we’d never get here. Malabo is complex. Equatorial Guinea is complex. To set the scene for blogging over the next few years, I will not publicly grapple with colonial legacies and living here as a wealthy white woman married to a Beninese-American while carrying a diplomatic passport.  Certainly, readers, we can discuss that in person...

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Happy New Year!

2017 was rough for me and my family. However, 2018 is a new year, a new post (Malabo!), and a new chance to seize the opportunities that are sitting right in front of our noses. Themes for 2018 Last year, I chose “joy” as my One Little Word, and did a terrible job of following through on it. This year, I’ve chosen “thrive,” and I believe that my chances of actually...

Easy Cake Pops 0

Easy Cake Pops

We’ve been slowly settling back into life in America.  Yes, America!  We left Jerusalem and we’re now living in Arlington, VA, where we’ll be for the next several months as I prepare for Malabo.  While not at work, I’ve been amusing myself by ordering my Starbucks coffee in English, and making desserts.  But only easy desserts. Like cake pops. The nice thing about cake pops is that they require minimal preparation, minimal...

Nahal Tse'Elim, Negev, Israel 20

Hiking Nahal Tse’Elim in the Negev

Keeping with 2017’s theme of doing shit that brings me joy, I went on a group hike again, this time to Nahal Tse’Elim, in the Negev.  I love the outdoors.  I love hiking.  And I love the sense of self-sufficiency that I’m gaining the more I explore the world around me. This hike was short (7km out and back) and non-technical. No pressure to go faster or get back by...

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2017’s Gotta Be Better Than 2016

I can’t live through another year like 2016. I don’t subscribe to a type of thinking where if you will good luck into existence, it will come. Positives attitudes don’t stop war or famine or poverty or injustice. But, not recognizing how good I’ve really got it is foolish, and my own negative attitude has made it difficult to appreciate everything that actually went well in 2016. 2017 may not...

HaMakhtesh HaKatan in the Negev, Israel 20

Five Things I Learned Hiking HaMakhtesh HaKatan in the Negev

Hiking in the Negev in Israel is as beautiful as it sounds, and something I’ve wanted to do since we arrived a few years ago.  As our time in Jerusalem is growing short, I ditched my spouse and kids, and signed up for a group hike in the HaMakhtesth HaKaton, a small crater in the Nagev.  The Makhtesh Katan is one of five craters in Israel, and seven in the...

Free things to do in Jerusalem with kids 22

Free Things to do in Jerusalem with Kids

It’s easy to bleed money when we’re traveling. It’s also easy to bleed money living in a city like Jerusalem. Lucky us, there are lots of free things to do in Jerusalem with kids. Explore the Old City The Old City in Jerusalem is beautiful and full of history. Whether you’re exploring the Church of the Holy Supulcre, walking the Via Delorosa, or visiting the Western Wall (aka the Kotel),...

Easy Desserts - Chocolate Covered Dates 12

Palestinian Desserts – Chocolate Covered Dates Stuffed with Pecans

Chocolate covered dates are an easy beginning to my foray into Palestinian desserts.  They’re a special occasion treat, something that I’ve seen mostly in small quantities at iftars or to be sold to tourists at artisan markets.  The dates are delicious and rich, a perfect accompaniment for coffee, but not something to be consumed in large quantities. I’ve had chocolate covered dates several times now, and each time I tell myself...

Celebrating Holidays Abroad 34

Celebrating Holidays Abroad – Reasons to Love It

Holidays are tough.  For everyone.  All over the world.  I’ve been celebrating the winter holidays abroad for a long time (in 10+ years abroad, I’ve spent three Christmases in the States).  Despite that, I’m finding that as this holiday season begins, I’m more homesick than usual.  I’m missing friends and family and pumpkin spice lattes.  Which is not to say that the life of an expat is not pretty damn...

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Making baby food in two hours per week (or less, even as an expat)

I made all of both my daughters’ baby food for stretches of about six months per child.  It sucked at first, but I slowly got into a rhythm that allowed me to make it in large batches.  Look, being a working mother is hard (being a mother is hard, period).  And I can see why folks don’t make their own baby food if they think it’s going to take six to eight...